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Me in a Nutshell

This is a cross-section of my particular flavor of nerderia, heavy on Katamari Damacy, Mario, and Perler beads. Who am I kidding? It's mostly reblogs of awesome stuff, including cats, owls, and unicorns, with a smattering of original content and some interesting commentary on the reblogs. I do, wild as it sounds, actually try to make friends (not just followers) on here.



Veritaserum  
I got in a discussion with a friend about weight/BMI yesterday. He casually inserted, “Well, he’s not overweight like me,” into our conversation. I was like, “Hold up. Why would you say that about yourself?” to which he replied, “Well, I am technically overweight.” I told him that I was too, and I think it’s a junk metric. He said, “But you look great!” So does he, not that this has anything to do with how much a person weighs. For example, I don’t think “fat” is a bad word. To me, it’s just descriptive and I would never use it in a negative light. If someone told me that Rebel Wilson or Melissa McCarthy were “fat, but beautiful,” I wold correct them that, no, they are fat AND beautiful. The two are not mutually exclusive. If someone wants to call my picture on the left (or even the right) “fat,” then as The Dude said: “Yeah, well, that’s just, like, your opinion, man.” It’s not how I would describe myself, but you’re not hurting me.   
Anyway, my friend, who I would describe as svelte and slightly muscular, didn’t say “fat.” He specifically said “overweight,” as if he is buying into the weight charts as standards that actually matter. Really? He tried to convince me that what he said was true, because his BMI “says” this. I had to calculate my own BMI, which also calls me “overweight” and even “pre-obese” depending on whose chart you use. If we accept that weight is a junk metric, then of course BMI is too, because it uses weight in its formula. To win (or at least end) the discussion, I had to pull out this photo and point out:
There is not a single pound of difference between these three frames.
I am in the exact same outfit, standing against the exact same wall, the exact same distance from the camera, and weighing 182 pounds in all three. The only thing that changes is time and how I look (including my hair and glasses).
I see notable changes in my face, chest, midsection, hips, and thighs — not to mention how much stronger and faster I am. The goals and milestones that I set for myself at boot camp center on my ability to do the exercises themselves. The way I end up looking is a byproduct, but I care absolute zero about my weight/BMI and being “overweight.” Yes, I know the science behind why my weight has stayed the same despite the loss of inches. My point is that I wouldn’t call myself super muscular or super athletic and yet weight and BMI charts still can’t account for me.  Junk.  Metrics.
Our bodies are not the same, and we shouldn’t be comparing them to each other and certainly not to charts.

I got in a discussion with a friend about weight/BMI yesterday. He casually inserted, “Well, he’s not overweight like me,” into our conversation. I was like, “Hold up. Why would you say that about yourself?” to which he replied, “Well, I am technically overweight.” I told him that I was too, and I think it’s a junk metric. He said, “But you look great!” So does he, not that this has anything to do with how much a person weighs. For example, I don’t think “fat” is a bad word. To me, it’s just descriptive and I would never use it in a negative light. If someone told me that Rebel Wilson or Melissa McCarthy were “fat, but beautiful,” I wold correct them that, no, they are fat AND beautiful. The two are not mutually exclusive. If someone wants to call my picture on the left (or even the right) “fat,” then as The Dude said: “Yeah, well, that’s just, like, your opinion, man.” It’s not how I would describe myself, but you’re not hurting me.   

Anyway, my friend, who I would describe as svelte and slightly muscular, didn’t say “fat.” He specifically said “overweight,” as if he is buying into the weight charts as standards that actually matter. Really? He tried to convince me that what he said was true, because his BMI “says” this. I had to calculate my own BMI, which also calls me “overweight” and even “pre-obese” depending on whose chart you use. If we accept that weight is a junk metric, then of course BMI is too, because it uses weight in its formula. To win (or at least end) the discussion, I had to pull out this photo and point out:

There is not a single pound of difference between these three frames.

I am in the exact same outfit, standing against the exact same wall, the exact same distance from the camera, and weighing 182 pounds in all three. The only thing that changes is time and how I look (including my hair and glasses).

I see notable changes in my face, chest, midsection, hips, and thighs — not to mention how much stronger and faster I am. The goals and milestones that I set for myself at boot camp center on my ability to do the exercises themselves. The way I end up looking is a byproduct, but I care absolute zero about my weight/BMI and being “overweight.” Yes, I know the science behind why my weight has stayed the same despite the loss of inches. My point is that I wouldn’t call myself super muscular or super athletic and yet weight and BMI charts still can’t account for me.  Junk.  Metrics.

Our bodies are not the same, and we shouldn’t be comparing them to each other and certainly not to charts.

Reblogged from selfconsciouscat
queenluciesroad:

this cat is just fat, sorry. But it´s not ok for poor thing

A message from Mabel’s mommy:I rescued Mabel as a stray on 9/2/05 at my university.  She was alone and crying in a parking lot that was packed, as it was the night of a football game.  I was afraid she would get run over, so I took her home.  When I took her to the vet the following Monday, she weighed 12 pounds, and the vet was sure she was pregnant.  It turned out that she had actually already been spayed.  Per the vet’s instructions, I put Mabel on a rationed diet of weight-control food.  Mabel reacted to this with great food insecurity, and began eating anything she could find in the floor (inanimate objects), but also gained weight while on this diet.  With the vet’s okay, I then switched to free-feeding her the weight-control food, to at least alleviate her food insecurity.  She continued to gain weight.  She was checked out for various kitty diseases and given a clean bill of health.  Knowing what Mabel and I had been through and the results, the vet told me that Mabel was “just a fat cat” and to let her be.  She now weighs 16 pounds, and she is active and healthy.  She has no trouble getting around and loves to play with the dog and with her feather on a stick.
Just as in people, “fat” does not necessarily mean “unhealthy.”
Don’t judge Mabel for being fat, and don’t judge me as a kitty mommy for Mabel being fat.  Mabel is fat.  Mabel is healthy.  Mabel is beautiful.  Mabel is loved. 

queenluciesroad:

this cat is just fat, sorry. But it´s not ok for poor thing

A message from Mabel’s mommy:

I rescued Mabel as a stray on 9/2/05 at my university.  She was alone and crying in a parking lot that was packed, as it was the night of a football game.  I was afraid she would get run over, so I took her home.  When I took her to the vet the following Monday, she weighed 12 pounds, and the vet was sure she was pregnant.  It turned out that she had actually already been spayed.  Per the vet’s instructions, I put Mabel on a rationed diet of weight-control food.  Mabel reacted to this with great food insecurity, and began eating anything she could find in the floor (inanimate objects), but also gained weight while on this diet.  With the vet’s okay, I then switched to free-feeding her the weight-control food, to at least alleviate her food insecurity.  She continued to gain weight.  She was checked out for various kitty diseases and given a clean bill of health.  Knowing what Mabel and I had been through and the results, the vet told me that Mabel was “just a fat cat” and to let her be.  She now weighs 16 pounds, and she is active and healthy.  She has no trouble getting around and loves to play with the dog and with her feather on a stick.

Just as in people, “fat” does not necessarily mean “unhealthy.”

Don’t judge Mabel for being fat, and don’t judge me as a kitty mommy for Mabel being fat.  Mabel is fat.  Mabel is healthy.  Mabel is beautiful.  Mabel is loved. 

(Source: selfconsciouscat, via lifelover981-deactivated2014080)

Reblogged from iamswhatiams
iamswhatiams:

You would think that, as someone who loves food, Mabel would be more willing to let her humans eat. But instead Mabel’s adorable naps almost made her mama, Drsugarbush, starve.

I like food (and naps) just as much as Mabel does.

iamswhatiams:

You would think that, as someone who loves food, Mabel would be more willing to let her humans eat. But instead Mabel’s adorable naps almost made her mama, Drsugarbush, starve.

I like food (and naps) just as much as Mabel does.

(via selfconsciouscat)

Reblogged from selfconsciouscat
ohcamil:

Best one yet!
ILU, Mabel :)

When I saw Adam make this, I thought you might like it!

ohcamil:

Best one yet!

ILU, Mabel :)

When I saw Adam make this, I thought you might like it!

(Source: selfconsciouscat)